Das Mädchen im roten Mantel Epub × Das Mädchen

Lorsqu’en 1993 Roma Ligocka assiste sur invitation du maire de Cracovie à la projection de La Liste de Schindler de Steven Spielberg elle reste pétrifiée devant la célèbre scène où une petite fille en manteau rouge traverse le paysage dévasté du ghetto « C’est moi Cette petite fille c’était moi »Ce film sera le déclic qui va permettre à ses souvenirs refoulés depuis 50 ans de remonter à la surfaceNée juive dans une famille aisée et unie elle est enfermée avec les siens dans le ghetto en mars 1941 à l’âge de trois ans et parvient à s’en évader avec sa mère en 1943Après avoir survécu à la Shoah et être devenue décoratrice de théâtre et peintre Roma Ligocka livre ici un témoignage déchirant sur son enfance ravagée véritable cri de douleur mais aussi d’espoir


10 thoughts on “Das Mädchen im roten Mantel

  1. says:

    25 starsUnfortunately I didn't like Roma much The story of her life started in the ghetto of Krakow at the beginning of the war It is told with a great distance the words didn't reach my heart


  2. says:

    Yes this is a harrowing story about this little girl and a fascinating insight to what it must have been like in Krakow at that time Sadly I did not warm to the author She came across as obsessed with herself Throughout the book she seems to want to put across how beautiful she was and how men would pursue her and ask to marry her at the drop of a hat This may well be the case but I really felt I did not need this information This author despite her terrible childhood did not ever have to endure being in a concentration camp You can walk away as she did from an alcoholic You could not walk away from Auschwitz She should not have put this comment in the book Also there is a theme throughout the book about her wanting to disappear or be invisible Despite this she still tells us how she would dress in colourful clothes and low cut tops Of course she has been mentally damaged by her past and I do feel for all of the children who endured what she did and far worse But I get a sense of this woman capitalising on her past in a way which I find a little irritating I also think the family who kept taking them into their home were not given as much attention as they deserved We are told Manuella the lovely daughter of this family had died The author idolised this young woman but all we are told is that she is dead I wanted to know about her and how she came to die I was also surprised to learn that the picture of the little girl in the red coat was not in fact the author she just 'recognised' herself in her I imagine so did many many other children


  3. says:

    Brutally beautiful


  4. says:

    It would really be misleading to call this a Holocaust memoir Roma Ligocka does write about the Holocaust but she was a very young child during that time and her vague fragmentary memories of it take up only a few chapters of the book The rest of the book is about her growing up and her adulthood as an artist I didn't find the book all that interesting and I thought Roma liked to promote herself a lot talking about how beautiful she was etc Interesting detail Roma's cousin is the famous film director Roman Polanski and he's one of the major characters in the early part of the book


  5. says:

    I read this book over the course of a day because I found it hard to put it down It's well written and very compulsive I found some of it very distressing and I got quite upset during the first half of it This is partly down to the subject matter but mostly down to the fact that the observations of the horror are written from the perspective of a young child The simplicity of the writing and the confusion of the child are very movingIt's an autobiography of Roma Ligocka and starts with her earliest memories She was born in Poland in 1939 to Jewish parents Her first years were spent in the Krakow Ghetto and are absolutely horrific Roma and her mother escaped the Ghetto and spent the rest of the war in hidingI was particularly interested in Roma's account of Ghetto life because she was so young Adults heap huge responsibilty on her She is expected to keep secrets and remember cover stories but is never told why She sees people shot in front of her and is told to look away and not think about it This particular way of thinking is something she adopts as an adult and she refuses to talk about her past even though she suffers from fears and phobias that stem from that time The chapters that cover Roma's teenage life are fascinating I have read a few books about adult Holocaust survivors and the way they coped after 1945 but it was the first time I'd read about a young person at that time Roma is creative and rebellious and desperate to find a place that she feels she belongs She throws herself into things she loves with passion like art and music She finds herself drawn to Communism and then becomes disenchanted by it There are also a number of references to Roman Polanski who is her cousin I think the thing that I liked most about this book was that I came away with a full picture of Roma Often autobiographies about the Holocaust end when the war ends and I'm left wondering what happened By writing a book that deals with the Holocaust and then goes on to write about her subsequent successes and failures Roma Ligocka becomes a rounded person to the reader


  6. says:

    Thoughts 1 I would hesitate to call this a Holocaust memoir it's of a life memoir And for the most part it works Half of the book is during the war and the second half follows her life afterwards The transition between the two sections is really well handled 2 Ligocka writes her memoir almsot like a novel It's very beginning middle end with the various people in her life weaving in and out like characters of a play I think that she misses beats in some areas I felt some of the people she talked about were under developed like her friends in her twenties as well as the relationship she had with some of the men that entered her life Further the pacing is a bit all over the place Ligocka rarely stays at certain moments for long which disconnected me with what she was feeling at each part of her life I think a part of this has to do with her writing which is here and there Of major issue is her descriptive writing I never felt like I was with her in the moment I coulnd't imagine what the scenes looked like or what he life really felt like especially earlier on3 The way she reminisces about her mother is on point and the flow of their relationship is handled extremely well There were some moments where you could really feel all the feelings That was excellent4 Yeah It's hard to rate a memoir as I sort of feel like I'm giving critique on a person's life But from what I read about her elsewhere I think this book could have been revised a few times to make connection with the readersRating 3 stars out of 5


  7. says:

    I really felt that this could have been over halfway through the book The author seems to be craving attention and is awfully spoiled as you'll find in the second half of the book I found her to be whiny about the people and events in her life not the Holocaust partthe rest of her life The part about her going through the Holocaust was really good After that though it seemed like she didn't want to wrap it up and by the end of her book I didn't care for her much She even complained that she wasn't given the time of day after the premiere of Schindler's List when she claimed to be the girl in the red coat Honestly why would it necessarily be her? So she had a red coat too? I'm not sure I'd give that claim the time of day either Her story about surviving the Holocaust is powerful and intense I just think she could have ended it with that


  8. says:

    This is not a book about her life as a holocaust survivor Rather a memoir of what came to be her life after escaping the horrors of the holocaust As such it is misleading I won't take away that it is an easy read and because it is written as memory recollections it is interesting It is not daunting harrowing or even captivating In fact I was taken aback at how manipulative selfish and ignorant she turned out to be After all her mother went through Cannot recommend this book as a good holocaust memoir For that read The Boy in the Stripes Pajamas fiction or even Diary of Anne Frank non fiction


  9. says:

    I purchased the book in the shop that is located at Oskar Schindler's factory in Krakow The visitor centre was outstanding and I wanted a book to be able to keep as a memento of the visit to Krakow We had also during our short break visited both Auschwitz Birkenau II and also Auschwitz I sites and naturally were horrified by the experiences Just being a tourist at such sites is horrific but to imagine what it must have been like at the time and to have experienced it in real life is enough to make your blood run ice cold I had previously watched Schindler's List on a few occasions over the years but it had been some time since I had last watched it so some of the things in the film were patchy in my memory So as any one knows who ever re reads a previous read knows it is always nice to rediscover forgotten parts of a story and to find links to things which show how inter connected people and experiences truly are This book does not fail you on that I can assure you If you have not yet read this book please look away now because this review will be full of spoilers for you If you have already read the book and are just reading previous reviews as I have this morning then please carry on readingEveryone who has ever watched Schindlers's List would probably say they can remember some or all of the scenes that show the girl wearing the red coat The deeper meaning of why this is shown in colour when everything else is in black and white has a number of possible explanations but the very essence of it is to highlight further the deeply deeply horrific event that is unfolding All tourists who do go and visit Schindler's factory will have also visited the area of the Ghetto known in Krakow as Getta so visually what the author is trying to describe is easier if you have watched Schindler's List and also if you have visited the sites described in the book and not just the sites of Jewish persecution but also the historical sites of Krakow too The main market square the restaurants and bars that surround the market square and its site streets The cathedrals the apartment blocks that are now apart hotels for tourists The stairwells and landings within the apartments blocks and also riding the trams street cars as Roma calls them that surround the old town and the lead over the Vistula River bridges towards the Getta and other places in the outskirts of KrakowThere are descriptions in the book of the old way of life for Jewish people in Krakow before the war and it must have been a lovely place to live back then how things then fell apart cannot be over emphasised Roma takes you on a journey through a very long period in Krakow's history both before the war from her recollections of what her mother used to tell her about it and also from her own recollections of the wartime period too and then how Krakow then changed again under the communist rule and how this period was also terrible I especially like the fact the book shows family photos as you go through the journey of reading it rather than the annoying way that some books put all the photos together in a middle section of the book so that you then see images later on from when you need to seek them or you then see them too early in the books story More books should do it this way in my opinion I remember early in the book seeing a large photo of some of her families friends and other family members that also points out that Roman Polanski's parents are in the middle of the back row Through the early part of book Roma does refer a lot to her cousin named Roman but not at anytime does she tell you her cousin is actually THE Roman Polanski That is a surprise much later towards the end It was also a big shock that when I re watched Schindler's List immediately after finishing the book that in the very ending scenes of the film where all of the actual survivors of Oskar Schindler walk past his grave stone in Israel and place a rock on top of it that the man shown as 'Ryszard Horowitz' is actually the same Ryszard Horowitz that she and Roman Polanski used to live with and play together with in the very aftermath of the war The three of them spent their time rediscovering some of their lost youth and rightfully so too Neither of these now famous characters were used at all on the back cover of the book or in the reviews at the front of the book to get you to purchase it and I respect that angle very much I think it was probably a very conscious decision between the author and the publisher and it really works well for that reason I thought Roma's detailing of her journey throughout her life was very interesting and vivid and I personally was engrossed from start to finish and read the book in less than 24 hours I started it waiting for my flight back home at Krakow airport and then finished it the next day Roma has had a journey and a half in her life and deserves her acclaim for what is a very well structured book It brought tears to my eyes on many occasions but also brought smiles to my face when she describes the finer things that happened to her too after the war I recommend the book anyway I am now going to purchase the Polish version of the book for my Polish partner to read as she will also be able to go on a journey through her own countries history in the same way I have just done


  10. says:

    Great book Moving Important Great perspective on the years after the war for this particular survivor